Comments on: Cerebus #8: A liberating effect http://cereblog.org/2009/03/19/cerebus-8-a-liberating-effect/ Just another WordPress.com weblog Sat, 18 Jul 2009 10:27:06 +0000 http://wordpress.com/ hourly 1 By: Eric http://cereblog.org/2009/03/19/cerebus-8-a-liberating-effect/#comment-354 Eric Wed, 20 May 2009 20:15:00 +0000 http://cereblog.org/?p=381#comment-354 Thanks Jeff for your always knowledgeable commentary. You should write a book! (Let me know if you'd like to collaborate . . . ) The offer from the Conniptins was indeed different and points the way toward the more considered meditations on power which make up the bulk of the comic from about issues twenty to, say, 300? Thanks Jeff for your always knowledgeable commentary. You should write a book! (Let me know if you’d like to collaborate . . . )

The offer from the Conniptins was indeed different and points the way toward the more considered meditations on power which make up the bulk of the comic from about issues twenty to, say, 300?

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By: Jeff Tundis http://cereblog.org/2009/03/19/cerebus-8-a-liberating-effect/#comment-272 Jeff Tundis Tue, 24 Mar 2009 22:54:03 +0000 http://cereblog.org/?p=381#comment-272 There are a few things I'd like to comment on. First, the offer from the Conniptins was different from the Pigts. The Pigtish situation was one of worship by a group of clueless savages who wanted to basically tear down anything they could without much rhyme or reason. The Conniptins were on a military quest for land and riches with an army that could be manipulated -- and they have swords! ;) The change Dave went through between issues 7 and 8 is probably a reference to his first nervous breakdown which was due to work related stress. He started experimenting with LSD shortly thereafter, which lead to another drug induced breakdown a year later around issue 11 for which he was briefly hospitalized. Shortly after that you'll see a DRAMATIC artistic shift lasting through issue 20. Lastly, the idea that Cerebus is special, and that people simply know it? It's touched on very briefly in the short story "Magiking" from Swords Of Cerebus #4 and The World Tour Book and that's about it, except for "Minds" (in the 190s issue-wise) and post-300 commentary by Sim. Glad to see you're feeling better! (Now watch Star Trek IV) -Jeff There are a few things I’d like to comment on. First, the offer from the Conniptins was different from the Pigts. The Pigtish situation was one of worship by a group of clueless savages who wanted to basically tear down anything they could without much rhyme or reason. The Conniptins were on a military quest for land and riches with an army that could be manipulated — and they have swords! ;)

The change Dave went through between issues 7 and 8 is probably a reference to his first nervous breakdown which was due to work related stress. He started experimenting with LSD shortly thereafter, which lead to another drug induced breakdown a year later around issue 11 for which he was briefly hospitalized. Shortly after that you’ll see a DRAMATIC artistic shift lasting through issue 20.

Lastly, the idea that Cerebus is special, and that people simply know it? It’s touched on very briefly in the short story “Magiking” from Swords Of Cerebus #4 and The World Tour Book and that’s about it, except for “Minds” (in the 190s issue-wise) and post-300 commentary by Sim.

Glad to see you’re feeling better! (Now watch Star Trek IV)

-Jeff

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By: Laura Hudson http://cereblog.org/2009/03/19/cerebus-8-a-liberating-effect/#comment-265 Laura Hudson Sat, 21 Mar 2009 01:39:16 +0000 http://cereblog.org/?p=381#comment-265 I mostly ignored the Star Trek references because I didn't think they were funny, but since I just wrote a Star Trek parody comic for a marketing magazine that I will probably never ever show anyone, you are welcome to call me a hypocrite and invite me to shut up. I don't think Cerebus is opposed to thinking so much as he is opposed to examining his own thoughts and feelings. He seems very aware of the weaknesses of others and how to manipulate them, which requires a certain amount of analysis and planning, although so far we've only seen him employ these skills against fairly simple individuals. He's also someone whose rational thinking can easily be clouded by passionate emotion, and whose instincts -- till now -- have lead him to pursue short-term rather than long-term gain. This battle between his impulse for independence and individuality at all costs and the decision to sacrifice some of that for a more comfortable future is making him weigh his instincts against his long-term goals. Which is a lot more looking in the mirror than he wants to do, so he finally says screw it and chooses inaction by coating it in a delicious shell of faux-decisiveness. I mostly ignored the Star Trek references because I didn’t think they were funny, but since I just wrote a Star Trek parody comic for a marketing magazine that I will probably never ever show anyone, you are welcome to call me a hypocrite and invite me to shut up.

I don’t think Cerebus is opposed to thinking so much as he is opposed to examining his own thoughts and feelings. He seems very aware of the weaknesses of others and how to manipulate them, which requires a certain amount of analysis and planning, although so far we’ve only seen him employ these skills against fairly simple individuals.

He’s also someone whose rational thinking can easily be clouded by passionate emotion, and whose instincts — till now — have lead him to pursue short-term rather than long-term gain. This battle between his impulse for independence and individuality at all costs and the decision to sacrifice some of that for a more comfortable future is making him weigh his instincts against his long-term goals. Which is a lot more looking in the mirror than he wants to do, so he finally says screw it and chooses inaction by coating it in a delicious shell of faux-decisiveness.

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By: Leigh Walton http://cereblog.org/2009/03/19/cerebus-8-a-liberating-effect/#comment-261 Leigh Walton Fri, 20 Mar 2009 06:46:41 +0000 http://cereblog.org/?p=381#comment-261 I have some formal notes on #8 coming up, but in terms of content: I feel like we have to at least acknowledge the Dr. McCoy Star Trek reference in this issue. So there we go, it's been acknowledged. Incidentally, I saw The Wrath of Khan the other night and was pretty disappointed. And I was drinking, which I feel should have made me easier to impress! Actually I fell asleep right in the middle of the climax, missing the activation of Genesis and blunting any chance of Spock's sacrifice making an impact on me... But still. This is supposed to be a contender for Best Star Trek Movie? Back to Cerebus. Yeah, why does he accept? Is this offer really different from the Pigt god-king offer? I suspect your reading is about the best that we'll be able to come up with. It was simply time for a change, for Sim and for Cerebus and for CEREBUS. Also, I want to register my surprise at the line "Self-examination appeals to Cerebus about as much as debating theology with a Panrovian monk" (i.e. not very much). In all the effort to establish Cerebus as super-competent and everyone else as super-dumb, I guess I've been tacitly thinking of Cerebus as cleverer than everyone else -- with some justification, I think, like the early O. Henry stories where Cerebus tricks some idiot into giving him a sack of gold or marrying some idiot woman. But Sim's staking a claim here that we should really not think of Cerebus as a big schemer, and upon reflection that's a better match with my memories of High Society. Cerebus is inherently valuable but not particularly talented at anything except combat, and moreover he prefers not to have to think too hard about anything. I have some formal notes on #8 coming up, but in terms of content:

I feel like we have to at least acknowledge the Dr. McCoy Star Trek reference in this issue. So there we go, it’s been acknowledged. Incidentally, I saw The Wrath of Khan the other night and was pretty disappointed. And I was drinking, which I feel should have made me easier to impress! Actually I fell asleep right in the middle of the climax, missing the activation of Genesis and blunting any chance of Spock’s sacrifice making an impact on me… But still. This is supposed to be a contender for Best Star Trek Movie?

Back to Cerebus. Yeah, why does he accept? Is this offer really different from the Pigt god-king offer? I suspect your reading is about the best that we’ll be able to come up with. It was simply time for a change, for Sim and for Cerebus and for CEREBUS.

Also, I want to register my surprise at the line “Self-examination appeals to Cerebus about as much as debating theology with a Panrovian monk” (i.e. not very much). In all the effort to establish Cerebus as super-competent and everyone else as super-dumb, I guess I’ve been tacitly thinking of Cerebus as cleverer than everyone else — with some justification, I think, like the early O. Henry stories where Cerebus tricks some idiot into giving him a sack of gold or marrying some idiot woman. But Sim’s staking a claim here that we should really not think of Cerebus as a big schemer, and upon reflection that’s a better match with my memories of High Society. Cerebus is inherently valuable but not particularly talented at anything except combat, and moreover he prefers not to have to think too hard about anything.

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